How to Change Your Writing Style.

To change your writing style, it’s best to have a plan. Try this. Identify the elements of writing then change one element at a time for what you believe will be an improvement. Then study basic elements for changing style, and then practice. Here are examples: VOCABULARY Word choice: Look for replacement words that accurately supply imagery, ideation, and emotion for the content and meaning of a story. There are so many word alternatives! The Oxford English Dictionary lists twenty-seven alternatives to the noun “pleasure,” forty-two choices for the adjective “perfect,” seventy-four choices for the verb “move,” such as go, … Read More…

Incorporating Rhythm in Prose Style

Virginia Woolf wrote this intriguing quote about writing fiction that deserves deliberate analysis. The quote: “Style is a very simple matter; it is all rhythm. Once you get that, you can’t use the wrong words.” Style for fiction writers is personally unique and is a distinctive way of using language, vocabulary, syntax, imagery, ideation, clarity, readability, format, emphasis … all commonly considered important components. Rhythm is a strong, regular repeated pattern of movement or sound … a pattern. Is that what Woolf is referring to? Patterns? Let’s look at Woolf’s writing, see if you feel a rhythmic flow. Did they … Read More…

Beauty and the Building of Character in a Literary Story

Appreciation of beauty is individual and it is never universally true to everyone. The fundamental question is: what makes anything seen, heard, felt, tasted–beautiful? Leo Tolstoy, the writer, spent the last fifteen years of his life pondering the aspects of art and beauty. (What is Art?) He believed beauty to the senses came from imagination and creativity. Perfection in the act of creating beauty (in the creation rather than the judgement) was important for beauty, but not critical. He was convinced originality was essential, and he decried imitation and that, with beauty, there was a transfer from creator to recipient … Read More…

Understanding Empathy

An Empathetic Fictional Character is Multidimensional. The importance of empathy in our lives is enormous but underestimated and often ignored. Empathy is a concept and an experience, and it seems that you may have it or not, and probably if you have it, it fluctuates throughout life. Although empathy is esoteric and impossible to define, it can be a profoundly useful concept in fictional character development … as well as in our lives. Psychologists try to corral an individual human understanding of others because of its social importance. And writers of fiction stories benefit from psychologists’ research to understand transference … Read More…

Is it, or is it not, irony?

As a figure of speech, irony adds meanings to situations, develops readers’ interest, makes literature more intriguing, and commands use of imagination to comprehend meanings. Moreover, it brings life to both drama and literature. Look to these well-known examples from Greek antiquity. Antony at Caesar’s funeral: I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. For Brutus is an honorable man; The first irony of Antony’s speech is that he is unequivocally there to praise Caesar. Antony is, in fact, lying. This is a calculated tactic to disarm a crowd firmly on the side of Brutus when Antony takes the … Read More…

A Secret of Great Literary Fiction Stories as Art

We live by stories, descriptions of people and events, real or fictional, that inform or entertain. Stories are ubiquitous as air, essential as a heartbeat, and as varied in the telling as there are humans to tell. The story as a fiction art-form in prose has evolved over the past few centuries, but recently has declined as literature, a regrettable fact emitting from failure of contemporary authors to strive for “art” in their “creative” writing. What is lost? Imagined fiction and literature as written works considered to have lasting artistic value. The loss of written story as an art form … Read More…

Career planning for aspiring, literary-fiction-story writers.

Plan #1 Want to be an author? Just do it and enjoy. That’s enough for most of us! Writing is a pleasure and we don’t have to be the best for all readers or achieve some impossible measure of success. BUT– If you want satisfaction for: a) being the best author of the best story you can write that might persist for generations, b) creating stories that speak to contemporary and future readers about the complexities of being human, then you may want to write a fiction story as an art form that engages, entertains, and enlightens, and consider these … Read More…

Improve storytelling by flexiblity in writing style.

A few literary-fiction storytellers effortless adjust to setting changes, different narrator perspectives, and point of view shifts. Most writers must work to develop changes in writing style when story scene requires improvement for reader acceptance. Her are a few skills that might be considered. I. SUCCINCTNESS A. More elaborate prose. Helen wanted commitment—meaning us married and settled in her seventeen-room, early twentieth-century house in town with tennis court and three-car garage.  She believed if we changed the furniture and decorated with art we chose together, we could be happy newlyweds.  But every time I stepped into her house, memories of … Read More…

What To Do for Writer’s Block

All literary fiction writers have problems with productivity related to ability and individual writing strategies. Writer’s block is a common term but it really doesn’t define a specific problem or suggest a consistent or dependable way to solve and proceed. The symptoms can be devastating—staring at a blank screen or page jilted by inspiration with quashed creativity. Here are famous authors’ solutions that might just squiggle your own path, for better or worse, to recovery. *Maya Angelou: “Writing is like any art or sport. Practice makes perfect. Inspiration will only come if you push yourself to keep putting pen to … Read More…

A Fiction-Writer Changes Style with Image-Words

What if the writer can, with words, create images in a reader’s mind that primarily stimulate setting and character in a fiction story. It’s a matter of choice, imagination, purpose, and style, and very individual. Using basic-story information of plot momentum, let’s augment basic story action-information with setting and characterization with authorial style changes as examples. They went to the birthday party of a man. Is it appropriate to develop setting and character in scene or narrative when the plot purpose is to simply move characters to a party? Will it inhibit or captivate a reader’s interest? Consider these examples. … Read More…